This really bothers me. It really bothers me when people throw garbage out the window of their car while they’re driving along my road. The ditch behind me often has lots of garbage in it and it really bothers me, it’s one of my pet peeves. A pet peeve is how we describe something in English that really, really bothers us. And in this video, I’m gonna talk a little bit about my pet peeves but at the same time, I’m going to teach you some phrases that you can use when you talk about the things that bother you.

This really bothers me. It really bothers me when people throw garbage out the windows of their cars. You’ll notice when I started this video, I used two phrases. The first thing I said was, “This really bothers me.” And the second phrase I used was, “It really bothers me when people throw garbage out of the window of their car while they’re driving along my road.” So those are just two ways to use the first phrase that I’m teaching you to talk about something that bothers you. In English, when you say that something bothers you, it means it aggravates you and maybe makes you just a little bit angry.

So I’m not the only person that drives this vehicle. Jen also drives this vehicle and my son also drives this vehicle and I’m noticing that the gas tank is empty. This drives me crazy. It drives me crazy when someone drives a vehicle and then they forget to put gas in it. So those are your next two phrases. You can say, “This drives me crazy,” when you see something that bothers you, and then you can describe it further by saying, “It drives me crazy when,” and then give the reason why that thing really, really bothers you. But this drives me crazy. It drives me crazy when the gas tank is empty and I need to go somewhere.

I hate this. I hate it when my kids leave their bikes and other things in places where I need to walk. It happens with more than just bikes, sometimes it’s toys, sometimes it’s bikes, sometimes it’s just stuff that has no business being where they left it. And then I use these two phrases, I say, “I hate this.” I know it’s a very strong word but we do say this in English. And I say, “I hate it when my kids leave stuff in my path and then I trip on it.”

This is a small chalkboard. At school, we have larger chalkboards in every classroom and sometimes people do this, they scratch the chalkboard with their nails. This is so aggravating. It’s so aggravating when people scratch a chalkboard with their nails. So those are your next two phrases. When you are describing something that is one of your pet peeves, you can say, “This is so aggravating. It’s so aggravating when people scratch something like a chalkboard with their nails.” It really bothers me quite a bit. I’m glad that in my classroom, I mostly have whiteboards now and very, very few chalkboards because this sound is so aggravating.

So the other day I was at the grocery store buying some groceries and there were people there that weren’t wearing their masks and I said to myself, “This drives me up the wall. It drives me up the wall when people don’t wear their masks when they’re in a public place.” In Ontario, Canada, in the province where I live right now, it is the law if you are inside a building, you need to wear a mask. So it drives me up the wall when people don’t wear their masks when they’re out in public. I mean, after all, you wear a mask not just to protect yourself, but more importantly, you wear a mask to protect all of the other people who you are around. So if you are someone who doesn’t wear a mask, please wear a mask because it drives me up the wall when people don’t wear their masks when they’re out in public.

A lot of my pet peeves are about things my children do. Please know that I do love my children dearly but sometimes they do things that drive me nuts. This drives me nuts. Sometimes they eat some chips and they leave the bag open and maybe they used some bowls and when they’re done, they just leave it outside. This drives me nuts. It drives me nuts when my children don’t clean up after themselves. So those are your next two phrases. You could say something drives you nuts. If you think about something in life that really, really bothers you, you could say, “This drives me nuts.” And then you could say, “It drives me nuts when,” and then you could explain what exactly is driving you nuts.

So if you look up here, you can see that there used to be a hole that went into the roof of our house and squirrels would go in that hole and run around in the ceiling. When that was happening, I would say, “This drives me bananas. It drives me bananas when animals come and try to live in your house.” We did eventually get them out but for a while, there were squirrels in our ceiling. By the way, squirrel is a very challenging word for all of you probably to say so let me say it a few more times. There were squirrels living in the ceiling and in the roof of our house and they would run around really early in the morning and it was driving me bananas.

I really like park benches, but some, oh, this is so annoying. It’s so annoying when people put their gum underneath a bench or a chair. It’s so annoying, this is so annoying. So there are two more sentences that you can use to describe something that is your pet peeve or something that you find annoying or even disgusting. This is so annoying. It is so annoying when people who chew gum take the gum out of their mouth and then they stick it underneath a park bench or a chair. And I just hate that feeling when you go like this and you touch somebody’s used chewing gum. It’s not just annoying, it’s a little bit disgusting.

So this next one isn’t specifically about things my children do. And again, I do love my children, but somehow mysteriously, the milk is sometimes left out on the counter and sometimes the milk goes bad. It’s really frustrating for me when food or when drinks go bad, that means the milk is sour. This milk isn’t quite sour but it would be if I left it out here for a long time. By the way, did you know in Canada, milk comes in bags and we all own these fun little plastic pitchers? So anyways, one of my pet peeves is when food goes bad. So here are two ways to describe that. I could say, “It’s so frustrating when people leave milk on the counter and it goes bad.” And again, if I just wanted to express my frustration, I could say, “This is so frustrating.” I think maybe this milk is going bad. Oh, I’m not sure. We’ll see. I’ll give it the sniff test. Nope, I think it’s okay.

Well hey, thank you so much for watching this little English lesson where you learn to express your feelings when talking about your pet peeves. I hope you were able to learn just a little bit more English in this video, and if this is your first time here, don’t forget to click that red subscribe button below and give me a thumbs up if this video helped you learn just a little bit more English. And if you have the time, why don’t you stick around and watch another video?